Organizations


  • Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Scrapbook

    The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) was a civil rights organization formed in 1956 after the NAACP was banned in that state. The ACMHR participated in major demonstrations in Birmingham between 1956 and 1965, from organizing boycotts of segregated businesses, to challenging segregation laws in court. This newsletter from 1961 documents some of the activities of the ACHMR; a program and donation card illustrate the group's fundraising efforts.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Bayard Rustin

    In this interview transcript, civil rights leader Bayard Rustin recalls his role in the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation, the 1963 March on Washington, and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP). Rustin and his support of Gandhian nonviolence had a major influence on the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., other civil rights leaders, and the demonstrations of the Civil Rights movement.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Concerned White Citizens of Alabama Scrapbook

    In response to the strict segregation and racial violence that doggedAlabama's black community in the 1960s, 72 whites formed the ConcernedWhite Citizens of Alabama. They promoted equality and marched insupport of voting rights for African Americans. This scrapbook containsthe group's constitution, a flyer from 1965, membership cards, and astatement of purpose that was used in a voting rights demonstration.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Decision in the Streets

    In the early 1960s, students from the University of California, Berkeley, and other civil rights activists formed the Ad Hoc Committee to End Racial Discrimination and took to the streets of San Francisco to protest racial inequality and unfair hiring practices. This video segment recalls their demonstrations of 1963-64.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Diane Nash and the Sit-Ins

    In this interview, civil-rights leader Diane Nash recalls her role in the 1960 Nashville sit-ins, the 1961 Freedom Rides, and the 1965 voting rights campaign in Selma, Alabama. As one of the founders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Nash mobilized her fellow college students to confront segregation and discrimination with nonviolent direct action. This resource is part of the Civil Rights collection.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Eileen Kelley Walbert

    In the 1960s, Birmingham, Alabama's strict segregation laws, andviolence against blacks, inspired whites like Eileen Walbert, shown inthis interview, to form the Concerned White Citizens of Alabama. Walbertand other sympathetic whites participated in demonstrations for racialequality. Like many civil rights activists, they too suffered reprisals.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Freedom Riders: Fresh Troops

    In this video segment from the American Experience: "Freedom Riders" Web site, view newsreel footage, interviews, and archival photos to explore how students in Nashville, Tennessee, prepared for civil rights protests by training in the techniques of nonviolent direct action. This training prepared them for several initial efforts focused on the Nashville community and made them ideal reinforcements when attacks by white mobs decimated the ranks of the first Freedom Riders in 1961. This resource is part of the American Experience: Freedom Riders Collection.

    Grades: 6-12
  • James Farmer and the Freedom Rides

    This interview with civil rights leader James Farmer recalls the Freedom Rides of 1961, when an interracial group rode two buses through the South to test enforcement of recent Supreme Court rulings that banned segregated seating on interstate buses and trains. More than 300 Freedom Riders were arrested and jailed before the Interstate Commerce Commission enforced the rulings.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael)

    This interview transcript documents Stokely Carmichael's his work in the Civil Rights movement. Initially a believer in nonviolent direct action and a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Carmichael was arrested more than 30 times. By 1966, Carmichael's views changed. He began advocating "Black Power" and militant resistance to racism, leading the organization to become increasingly radical, diverging from the doctrine of passive resistance.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Lola Hendricks

    The leadership of the Civil Rights Movement was largely defined by major figures like Martin Luther King Jr., but behind the scenes were people like Lola Hendricks who helped organize the community and filed lawsuits to end discrimination and segregation. In this interview, Hendricks describes her role in the Civil Rights movement.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Rev. C. T. Vivian

    In this interview, civil rights leader Reverend C. T. Vivian recalls his role in the 1960 Nashville sit-in movement, the 1961 Freedom Rides, and the 1965 Selma voting rights campaign. An executive staff member of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Vivian was an ardent advocate of nonviolence.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Robert Moses

    Robert Moses was a leader in the voting rights campaign of the 1960s. Raised and educated in the North, Moses put his teaching career on hold and moved to Mississippi, where he became one of the architects of the 1964 Freedom Summer Project and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In this interview, recorded for Eyes on the Prize, Moses talks about his desire to end racial discrimination by helping African Americans participate fully in the nation's political process.

    Grades: 9-12
  • Freedom Riders: The Student Leader

    In this video segment from the American Experience: "Freedom Riders" Web site, watch interviews and newsreel footage and see archival photos to learn about the early efforts of a prominent student leader of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Diane Nash, a young Chicago native, was attending Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, when she was introduced to nonviolent direct action. She quickly became an influential student activist through her leadership of sit-ins in Nashville, her participation in the Freedom Rides, and her role in founding the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and the Selma Campaign. This resource is part of the American Experience: Freedom Riders collection

    This video includes language that is considered offensive. However, it provides authentic documentation of the bigotry of the era.

    Grades: 6-12
  • Freedom Riders: The Young Witness

    In this video segment adapted from the American Experience: "Freedom Riders" Web site, watch interviews and newsreel footage and see archival photos to learn about the response of one young Southerner to her community's violent confrontation with the Freedom Riders in May 1961. Janie Forsyth, a 12-year-old girl living on the outskirts of Anniston, Alabama, was moved to assist injured Freedom Riders when their bus was firebombed outside her father's grocery store. Her action earned her the hostility of her community, which felt that violent resistance was required to preserve the existing segregated order. This resource is part of the American Experience: Freedom Riders collection.

    This video includes language that is considered offensive. However, it provides authentic documentation of the bigotry of the era.

    Grades: 6-12

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